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The Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019 Part 3

My Sister, the Serial Killer (continuation)
My Sister, the Serial Killer (continuation)

My Sister, the Serial Killer (continuation)

Things however take a more complicated turn when Ayoola begins dating a doctor at the hospital where Korede works, not only that but she has long been in love with this man too. Korede is forced to choose between her sister and the man she loves in a dilemma that’ll keep you questioning your own morals and actions all the while. It’s a story about love, crime and turmoil that will grip you from start to finish.

Milkman
Milkman

Milkman

Author: Anna Burns

Milkman is an ambiguous tale that tells of an 18-year-old girl growing up in 1970s Northern Ireland, a time in which the country went through something of a crisis with political upheaval and the IRA effecting the way everyone lives their lives. Burns is a Belfast native herself so is well versed with the situation, that combined with her wry wit and penchant for storytelling help make this book a fantastic read. The book tackles many of the issues that women still face today, in the story our protagonist is attempting to hide the fact that she has a “maybe-boyfriend” from her mother, not only that but she’s also trying to hide the fact that she has received some unwanted attention from the Milkman too. Unfortunately for her, her brother in-law seems to be figuring out just what’s gone on and rumours begin to swell about her and the men, including that they may even be members of the IRA. The book tackles issues like the patriarchy, religious oppression, tribalism and the rumour mill in a fantastic way. You’ll feel the weight of each issue but in a stroke of genius you’ll be laughing all the way. Burns has effectively found a way to both cut you and leave you laughing in this excellent book.

Ordinary People
Ordinary People

Ordinary People

Author: Diana Evans

This is Evans’s third book, it’s set in London 2008 and follows to couples, both of black and mixed-race heritage. Set against the inauguration of Barack Obama, a moment major acceptance, this book studies these relationships and their hardships intently. First there is Melissa and Michael, Melissa has just given birth, she desperately doesn’t want it to change her, but she can feel herself slipping the more she mothers it. Meanwhile Michael grows more accustomed to his long commute to work, though he may still love Melissa he’s lost that initial spark and struggles to stay faithful to her. Our second couple are Stephanie and Damien, they’re the happy parents of three children, that is until the death of Damien’s father. He finds his world has been rocked, is it just the death of his father or is it something else? Ordinary People is a book that focuses on all the issues families and couples face, identity, grief, parenthood, sex, aging and the delicate frame of love itself. It’s something that we all can relate to.